No.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

When your child is a newborn, they cry a lot.  That's stressful, at least until you start to figure out what they need and what different cries sound like. (And/or get them medicine for reflux, which was sent down from heaven.)  Then, you feel like the Baby Whisperer, which, in fact, you are.  Each parent is a Baby Whisperer to their own child.  It's the perfect system:  The most gratifying reward ever is built into the world's most monumental task.

Then, when your child starts to toddle and babble, they cry less.  Because there is less reason for them to.   They're rocking their nap times, favorite toys, and sippy cups like little, well, rock stars.  Tears are for tantrums, boo boos, and other unpredictable flare-ups.    This, for the record, is a happy time in Parenting Land.

This weekend, we hit an important (and terrifying) developmental milestone.  Jack started saying, "No."

Don't get me wrong.  I am delighted to get to know Jack with words.  His personality is big.  We know this without the benefit of words.  And the words he uses are adorable and enlightening.  He loves his dogs, his parents, his balls, and his sippy cup.  The kid's got priorities.  

With the advent of "no," we're entering a new phase.  Independence.  Defiance.  Absolutes.  Tantrums.  Discipline.  Sentences.

Do I feel ready?  No.

Do I have to be?  Yes.

Will there be more stories?  Oh, hell yes.

Here's to your favorite words,

2 comments:

  1. 1. Words are the best... even 'no' can be super fun. For me anyway :)

    2. You're a Scorpio too? Oh man are we gonna have fun.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Heh Heh. This is going to be a wild ride.

    ReplyDelete

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

No.

When your child is a newborn, they cry a lot.  That's stressful, at least until you start to figure out what they need and what different cries sound like. (And/or get them medicine for reflux, which was sent down from heaven.)  Then, you feel like the Baby Whisperer, which, in fact, you are.  Each parent is a Baby Whisperer to their own child.  It's the perfect system:  The most gratifying reward ever is built into the world's most monumental task.

Then, when your child starts to toddle and babble, they cry less.  Because there is less reason for them to.   They're rocking their nap times, favorite toys, and sippy cups like little, well, rock stars.  Tears are for tantrums, boo boos, and other unpredictable flare-ups.    This, for the record, is a happy time in Parenting Land.

This weekend, we hit an important (and terrifying) developmental milestone.  Jack started saying, "No."

Don't get me wrong.  I am delighted to get to know Jack with words.  His personality is big.  We know this without the benefit of words.  And the words he uses are adorable and enlightening.  He loves his dogs, his parents, his balls, and his sippy cup.  The kid's got priorities.  

With the advent of "no," we're entering a new phase.  Independence.  Defiance.  Absolutes.  Tantrums.  Discipline.  Sentences.

Do I feel ready?  No.

Do I have to be?  Yes.

Will there be more stories?  Oh, hell yes.

Here's to your favorite words,
 
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